Performance comparison of machine learning algorithms and number of independent components used in fMRI decoding of belief vs. disbelief

Performance comparison of machine learning algorithms and number of independent components used in fMRI decoding of belief vs. disbelief

P.K. Douglas Sam Harris Alan Yuille Mark Cohen
3.5/5 (9 ratings)
Machine learning has become a popular tool for mining functional neuroimaging data, and there are now hopes of performing such analyses efficiently in real-time. Towards this goal, we compared accuracy of six different ML algorithms applied to neuroimaging data of persons engaged in a bivariate task, asserting their belief or disbelief of a variety of propositional statements. We performed unsupervised dimension reduction and automated feature extraction using independent component analysis and extracted IC time courses. Optimization of classification hyperparameters across each classifier occurred prior to assessment. Maximum accuracy was achieved at 92% for Random Forest, followed by 91% for AdaBoost, 89% for Naïve Bayes, 87% for a J48 decision tree, 86% for K*, and 84% for support vector machine. For real-time decoding applications, finding a parsimonious subset of diagnostic ICs might be useful. We used a forward search technique to sequentially add ranked ICs to the feature subspace. For the current data set, we determined that approximately six ICs represented a meaningful basis set for classification. We then projected these six IC spatial maps forward onto a later scanning session within subject. We then applied the optimized ML algorithms to these new data instances, and found that classification accuracy results were reproducible. Additionally, we compared our classification method to our previously published general linear model results on this same data set. The highest ranked IC spatial maps show similarity to brain regions associated with contrasts for belief > disbelief, and disbelief < belief.
Language
English
Pages
10
Format
Unbound
Publisher
Elsevier
Release
November 10, 2010

Performance comparison of machine learning algorithms and number of independent components used in fMRI decoding of belief vs. disbelief

P.K. Douglas Sam Harris Alan Yuille Mark Cohen
3.5/5 (9 ratings)
Machine learning has become a popular tool for mining functional neuroimaging data, and there are now hopes of performing such analyses efficiently in real-time. Towards this goal, we compared accuracy of six different ML algorithms applied to neuroimaging data of persons engaged in a bivariate task, asserting their belief or disbelief of a variety of propositional statements. We performed unsupervised dimension reduction and automated feature extraction using independent component analysis and extracted IC time courses. Optimization of classification hyperparameters across each classifier occurred prior to assessment. Maximum accuracy was achieved at 92% for Random Forest, followed by 91% for AdaBoost, 89% for Naïve Bayes, 87% for a J48 decision tree, 86% for K*, and 84% for support vector machine. For real-time decoding applications, finding a parsimonious subset of diagnostic ICs might be useful. We used a forward search technique to sequentially add ranked ICs to the feature subspace. For the current data set, we determined that approximately six ICs represented a meaningful basis set for classification. We then projected these six IC spatial maps forward onto a later scanning session within subject. We then applied the optimized ML algorithms to these new data instances, and found that classification accuracy results were reproducible. Additionally, we compared our classification method to our previously published general linear model results on this same data set. The highest ranked IC spatial maps show similarity to brain regions associated with contrasts for belief > disbelief, and disbelief < belief.
Language
English
Pages
10
Format
Unbound
Publisher
Elsevier
Release
November 10, 2010